Thread: Jeremy Corbyn
View Single Post
Old 05-01-2016, 19:17   #24
TheSultanOfShoeVomit
Going for a swim
 
TheSultanOfShoeVomit's Avatar
 
AKA: Starkweather
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 52,409
TheSultanOfShoeVomit is a cheating bobble-hatted mincebag.TheSultanOfShoeVomit is a cheating bobble-hatted mincebag.TheSultanOfShoeVomit is a cheating bobble-hatted mincebag.TheSultanOfShoeVomit is a cheating bobble-hatted mincebag.TheSultanOfShoeVomit is a cheating bobble-hatted mincebag.TheSultanOfShoeVomit is a cheating bobble-hatted mincebag.TheSultanOfShoeVomit is a cheating bobble-hatted mincebag.TheSultanOfShoeVomit is a cheating bobble-hatted mincebag.TheSultanOfShoeVomit is a cheating bobble-hatted mincebag.TheSultanOfShoeVomit is a cheating bobble-hatted mincebag.TheSultanOfShoeVomit is a cheating bobble-hatted mincebag.
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Malcolm Tucker View Post
Far from it, I'm just stating the reality. You can't have a divided opposition. A bit of fallout after the leadership contest, fine, but months later and they're still openly talking like this is just a temporary thing they're putting up with. I'm not saying Corbyn has to surrender his principles and just appease his MPs, but one way or another he needs a united party and that starts with the cabinet.
You haven't explained why your have the position you do, or provided specific examples that support your argument.

Quote:
I think he's given a lot of leeway and got very little back and a time will come, IMO, where he will need to decide to either trundle on with a cabinet that directly contradicts him in interviews (in an election campaign it's just a shambles) and hope the electorate somehow see through the fog and go for him. Or, he says to 'to hell with it' recognises sometimes kindness is weakness, and puts in his own dream team cabinet that will back him. Labour MPs will then have to put up or shut up. Risky, but ultimately as leader I think he's within his rights to have a cabinet he believe is the strongest leadership for the party. So far he's clearly giving them the benefit of the doubt and hoping they'll have healthy, private debates on policy, agree on positions and then be united publicly over them. So far it seems a distant ambition, where I think MPs are willing to make absolutely no compromise for their leader and the new membership, but also wish to remain.
I think it's stupid for his cabinet not to back him, and I feel that's because they don't realise his potential for support from the electorate. But also, these attitudes of cronyism are the problems that I hoped he was a departure from. I think you may be judging him too quickly in thinking that the dissent is a serious problem, given the nature of the Labour party, it seems like a necessary stage through which he must progress before finding a cabinet that is more capable and offers what the Tories do not. I don't think it's a problem.

Quote:
Well it's an opinion piece, and I think the false dilemma is apparent when you suggest you can do both, I don't think people have the enthusiasm or appetite to have the political agenda so full of things that everything gets equal attention, or wrath. It's evident that the Tory PR machine takes full advantage of Labour filling the headlines with their in-fighting.
Do you think the electorate is so informed, particualrly at this stage in the election cycle, that a few extra opinions will be that deleterious? Also, incumbents lose elections, rather than opposition wins them, and I don't think at this stage that conflict within the Labour party will really have any effect by the time the election comes. I think it's good to have a process of evolution in the mean time, rather than be scared of change and request control. If you want control, vote Tory.

Also, I think people want MPs to be a bit more human and a bit more human. Remember 'these strikes are wrong'? Being on message can also work against candidates...
__________________
TheSultanOfShoeVomit is offline   Reply With Quote